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Tenement Museum Walking Tour: Storefront Stories

Posted by sumolsen
13 Dec 2014 20:19

By Ariel Rosenblum

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“Storefront Stories,” the Tenement Museum walking tour of Orchard Street explores experiences of immigrant entrepreneurs of the past and present in heart of the Lower East Side’s historic shopping district. A salient point on the tour highlighted the commercial cycles the neighborhood has gone through- from pushcart to storefront- and with these developments, changes and adaptations from one family generation to another. The most recent iteration in this cycle is the momentum of gentrification that is presently changing the demographic in the neighborhood that has long been occupied by immigrant families and entrepreneurs. Interestingly, the Museum straddles preservation of the neighborhood’s history on one hand, while being an agent of change on the other. Drawing thousands of visitors to the area each week, upscale eateries and boutiques have sprung up to meet the influx of cultural and economic capital these tourists and visitors seek from and bring to the neighborhood.

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Vernacular New York: Social and Religious Architecture, An Encounter with Sukkot in Crown Heights

Posted by sumolsen
23 Nov 2014 21:46

By Ariel Rosenblum

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The Jewish holiday of Sukkot is marked annually every autumn by the building of temporary dwellings. These structures called sukkahs (plural: sukkot) represent the nomadic shelters the Israelites lived in for 40 years during their journey through the Sinai Desert after their exodus from Egypt. On October 14th, the last day of the weeklong Sukkot festival, Gabrielle Berlinger’s “Vernacular New York” class visited the Crown Heights neighborhood in Brooklyn at the intersection of Eastern Parkway and Kingston Street, the epicenter of the Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic movement. There, we continued an examination of social and religious architecture through the lens of the Sukkot holiday. The trip encompassed both temporary and permanent religious spaces, and tangible and intangible traditions that sustain one another.

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Alexis Hagadorn, “Unbinding Conservation: Observations on the Past, Present, and Future of Rare Book Treatment”

Posted by sumolsen
15 Nov 2014 17:41

By Summer Olsen

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On October 27, 2014 conservator Alexis Hagadorn gave a Brown Bag Lunch Talk at the Bard Graduate Center entitled “Unbinding Conservation: Observations on the Past, Present, and Future of Rare Book Treatment.” Hagadorn is currently the Head of Conservation for the Columbia University Libraries, where she has worked as a rare books and special collections conservator since 1997, and is a member of the visiting faculty at the Pratt Institute School of Information and Library Science, and the Conservation Center of the Institute of fine Arts at New York University.

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Walk the Neighborhood: It’s Worth It!

Posted by sumolsen
13 Nov 2014 19:15

By Carlie Fishgold

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“Don’t J-walk.” It’s the only rule. Filing down the sidewalks of Orchard Street with Educator/Guide Anna Duensing, away from the Tenement Museum, and into the public domain of Lower East Side streets, the “Outside the Home” tour provides a breath of fresh air for an audience accustomed to the stale, discursive habits of old school museum docents. It seems no coincidence that Anna’s introduction accounted for the human necessity of light and fresh air—elements not so prevalent in tenement design and development until the advent of city code requirements.

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Photographs, Daguerreotypes, and Prints: Collection Care at the MET

Posted by sumolsen
13 Nov 2014 01:18

By Hadley Jensen
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“Unlike other conservation specialties, the field of photograph conservation remains as complex and heterogeneous as the medium of photography itself.” (Grant Romer)

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