Blog

Brown Bag Lunch Talk: “Textile Conservation at Historic Royal Palaces: A 100-Year History”

Posted by sumolsen
09 Dec 2015 21:49

By Catherine Stergar and Summer Olsen

2015_QueenAnne_V3.jpg

Charlotte Gamper, who is a textile conservator at Historic Royal Palaces in the United Kingdom, gave a Brown Bag Lunch talk entitled “Textile Conservation at Historic Royal Palaces: A 100-Year History” on November 19, 2015. Gamper obtained her degree in textile conservation at the University of Glasgow and has worked at Historic Royal Palaces for over three years. Historic Royal Palaces manages six palaces in the UK that are open to the public for tours and events. These palaces are Hampton Court Palace, Tower of London, Kensington Palace, Kew Palace, Banqueting House, and Hillsborough Castle. Gamper began her talk by sharing the history of textile restoration and conservation at Historic Royal Palaces before describing recent conservation projects there.

read more...


Comments: 0
Tags:


Cultures of Conservation ‘Keyword’ Panel: Conserving an Alutiiq Kayak

Posted by sumolsen
12 Nov 2015 18:30

By Catherine Stergar
On Tuesday, October 27, 2015, the Bard Graduate Center hosted the “Cultures of Conservation ‘Keyword’ Panel: Conserving an Alutiiq Kayak.” Four panelists spoke about several key issues regarding the preservation and conservation of an Alutiiq warrior or whaler kayak in the collection of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Harvard%20Kayak%20image%281%29.jpg

The mid-19th century kayak, which is believed to be the only surviving Alutiiq warrior/whaler kayak, came into the collection of the Peabody museum in 1869. In 2011, the Peabody museum received a grant from the Save America’s Treasures Program to conserve the kayak in addition to over one hundred other Alutiiq artifacts in the Peabody collection, all of which will be loaned to the Alutiiq Museum in Kodiak, Alaska, for a period of ten years.

read more...


Comments: 0
Tags:


Cultures of Conservation Events 2015-2016

Posted by sumolsen
23 Oct 2015 04:39

The following evening panels, lunchtime talks, and lectures will be convened this school year under the auspices of “Cultures of Conservation,” a five-year curricular initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Each event title links to more information about the event on the Bard Graduate Center website.

read more...


Comments: 0
Tags:


AIC & CAC-ACCR 2016 Joint Annual Meeting & Conference: Call for Papers

Posted by sumolsen
08 Sep 2015 19:44

The theme for AIC's 44th Annual Meeting, held jointly with the 42nd Annual CAC-ACCR Conference, in Montreal, Canada, May 13-17, 2016, will be “Emergency! Preparing for Disasters and Confronting the Unexpected in Conservation.”

read more...


Comments: 0
Tags:


Extreme Conservation Symposium Guest Post: Petra Lange-Berndt

Posted by sumolsen
26 Apr 2015 17:57

Petra%20Lange-Berndt.jpg

Following our "Extreme Conservation Symposium" (convened March 20, 2015), we asked each presenter to share one idea from his or her presentation in short form on this blog. We are grateful for this opportunity to continue thinking through their groundbreaking work.


This talk focused on the installation Little Savages by artist Tessa Farmer, exhibited at the Natural History Museum, London, in 2007. A taxidermied fox, other natural materials, and tiny malevolent fairies made by the artist out of insect and plant material, create narratives concerning ecology. The materials used by Farmer lead us to reflect upon the history of taxidermy, its impact on fashion and its position as a domestic handicraft. Farmer, a vegetarian, is using references to taxidermy, fairies, and social insects in order to question the authority of the institution in which she is exhibiting. She is not creating a nostalgic vision of craft. Instead, her work represents an alliance between handicraft and recent technologies in the age of the Internet. Natural materials and electronic mass media are interrelated in Farmer’s work, driven by curiosity about the material at hand, be it tangible or ephemeral. The audience is reminded that neither materials nor nature can be frozen and preserved for eternity, but instead are subject to processes of decay, death, and evolution.

read more...


Comments: 0
Tags:


page 1 of 3123next »